Philosophy of education · Powerful knowledge · Research · Teaching and Learning · Traditionalism

The dangers for education of a simplistic ’cause and effect’ model of knowledge development

Biesta (2014) makes the point that none of us can have failed to notice that over the last few years there has been an ongoing discussion about the place of knowledge in the curriculum: In a number of recent publications, the British sociologist Michael Young has argued that there is a need to bring knowledge… Continue reading The dangers for education of a simplistic ’cause and effect’ model of knowledge development

Professional Development

On Professional Development: the smallness of repeated actions

Educational practice is arguably a specific form of human experience. Schutz describes “meaning” as human reflection upon experience (or practice), making a distinction between experience and the meaning of that experience to the individual. In other words, what we do as teachers is not the same as the way we think about what we do. In… Continue reading On Professional Development: the smallness of repeated actions

Education and Politics · Policy and Practice

The irrational rationality of educational policy making

  In a recent speech launching the Education white paper, Nicky Morgan said: We have not only the best qualified workforce in history, but also a workforce that is increasingly focused on constant self-improvement, that is driven by the evidence and which like other professions is breaking new boundaries, sharing what works, challenging one another and… Continue reading The irrational rationality of educational policy making

Education and Politics · Philosophy of education · Progressivism

On the epistemic fallacy: a response to Tim and Martin:

I thought I would write a reply to two great blogs one by Martin Robinson and a second by Tim Taylor. Both great bloggers. I am conscious of reducing their respective opinions to one blog, which would be unfair so this is really just a contribution to the debate on the basis that their views are… Continue reading On the epistemic fallacy: a response to Tim and Martin:

Education and Culture · Education and Politics · OFSTED · Philosophy of education · Policy and Practice

Social objects, Space-time and Quirks in Education

In 1906, soon after Albert Einstein announced his special theory of relativity, his former college teacher in mathematics, Hermann Minkowski, developed a new scheme for thinking about space and time: Space-time does not evolve, it simply exists. When we examine a particular object from the stand point of its space-time representation, every particle is located… Continue reading Social objects, Space-time and Quirks in Education

Education and Politics · Philosophy of education · Progressivism · Research · Traditionalism

On non-cognitive skills and the “no position” position

I was interested over the Christmas period to follow, and engage with, the debate about the Progressive-Neo-Traditionalist dichotomy. I have also read some critiques of the dichotomy like this one by Stephen Tierney. It seemed to me that this particular blog conforms to the “no position” position. This usually entails a critique of the dichotomy before suggesting… Continue reading On non-cognitive skills and the “no position” position

Philosophy of education · Progressivism · Traditionalism

On the difference between Traditionalist and Progressive approaches to the curriculum

Giordano Bruno ( 1548 – 1600),  was an Italian Dominican friar. Beginning in 1593, Bruno was tried for heresy by the Roman Inquisition on charges including denial of several core Catholic doctrines.  In 1600 he was burned at the stake in Rome. Bruno was said to be deeply influenced by Arab astrology, Neoplatonism, Renaissance Hermeticism and was… Continue reading On the difference between Traditionalist and Progressive approaches to the curriculum

Philosophy of education · Progressivism · Traditionalism

Recent history shows the value of the Prog v Trad divide

There are, on the internet, numerous lists categorising progressivism and traditionalism. Mostly they are wrong for one simple reason, the dividing line between the two is not pedagogical but philosophical. You can use direct instruction in both approaches but in different ways and for different reasons. It is not only how it is taught but… Continue reading Recent history shows the value of the Prog v Trad divide