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You can only know what you think about: a response to David Didau

The knowledge / thinking debate has rumbled on for a while. David Didau critiqued my view that  you only know what you think suggesting that “it’s disingenuous in the extreme to suggest that thought can precede knowledge”. My view is that it does, not only can you “think about what you don’t know” but that… Continue reading You can only know what you think about: a response to David Didau

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Teaching is at the new frontier of human endeavour; making social practice work better

Policy makers, watchdogs, think tanks all want evidence. It gives them control. The levers with which to manipulate, those who need manipulating. It also gives some protection when things go wrong; “the evidence pointed in that direction”. The government wants simple solutions it can sell to the electorate. OFSTED wants to pretend that it has expertise. Senior… Continue reading Teaching is at the new frontier of human endeavour; making social practice work better

Philosophy of education

On critical thinking and educational research: the fields of conflict

“One of the major differences I see in the political climate today is that there is less collective support for coming to critical consciousness – in communities, in institutions, among friends.” I wrote about a particular meme in my last blog. The view that critical thinking is indivisible from knowledge. This has been adopted to the extent… Continue reading On critical thinking and educational research: the fields of conflict

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On Willingham and Dweck: pedagogic memes can be dangerous in practice

I was intrigued by the idea of a pedagogic meme.  One of @surreallyno’s recent blogs was the inspiration for the idea. The blogs are most definitely worth a read here and here; if you haven’t already done so. I’m not entirely sure about the concept of meme. It seems to be a biological type explanation… Continue reading On Willingham and Dweck: pedagogic memes can be dangerous in practice

Education and Politics

On Michaela Community School: knowledge imprisons you whilst doubt sets you free

Where I come from there is a tradition of drinking Benedictine. For those not in the know Benedictine is a herbal liqueur developed by Alexandre Le Grand. I don’t know how many on eduTwitter drink “bene “n” hot” but I do, it’s a tradition. Apparently soldiers from East Lancashire used to drink benedictine to keep… Continue reading On Michaela Community School: knowledge imprisons you whilst doubt sets you free

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Critical realism in education – part two: the turn to realism in educational theory

In the first part of this blog I argued that neo-traditionalism cannot offer a view of knowledge because it is based upon epistemological assumptions.In order to circumvent this problem neo-traditionalism has adopted a concept, “the best that has been thought and said”, that is fraught with problems. The blog aims to show that a form… Continue reading Critical realism in education – part two: the turn to realism in educational theory