Education and Politics · Philosophy of education · Progressivism

On the epistemic fallacy: a response to Tim and Martin:

I thought I would write a reply to two great blogs one by Martin Robinson and a second by Tim Taylor. Both great bloggers. I am conscious of reducing their respective opinions to one blog, which would be unfair so this is really just a contribution to the debate on the basis that their views are… Continue reading On the epistemic fallacy: a response to Tim and Martin:

Education and Politics · Philosophy of education · Progressivism · Research · Traditionalism

On non-cognitive skills and the “no position” position

I was interested over the Christmas period to follow, and engage with, the debate about the Progressive-Neo-Traditionalist dichotomy. I have also read some critiques of the dichotomy like this one by Stephen Tierney. It seemed to me that this particular blog conforms to the “no position” position. This usually entails a critique of the dichotomy before suggesting… Continue reading On non-cognitive skills and the “no position” position

Philosophy of education · Progressivism · Traditionalism

Traditionalist and progressive knowledge: causally related but analytically distinct

Introduction In this blog I would like to offer a view of the progressive v traditionalist dichotomy through the lens of structure, culture and agency. I am also going to argue that ideas can exist as material objects in the social world. There is a proviso; the ideas must have the potential to be understood.… Continue reading Traditionalist and progressive knowledge: causally related but analytically distinct

Ed-Tech · Progressivism · Teaching and Learning

On “powerful” progressive teaching: using ed-tech and storyboarding to secure key concepts

In the last blog I discussed creating the discourse of a subject. This is based upon infusing the discourse of the everyday with “powerful” concepts in order to construct pedagogic discourse. Story boarding is a teaching approach I use a lot particularly if the concepts are abstract and relatively complex. Constructivism seems to be constantly under fire. I… Continue reading On “powerful” progressive teaching: using ed-tech and storyboarding to secure key concepts

Powerful knowledge · Progressivism · Teaching and Learning

On “powerful”progressive teaching: creating the discourse of the subject

Recently I was talking to a group of friends, not high achievers in the conventional sense but well educated. Okay they were teachers. Somehow the conversation got around to the most pointless things we had ever learned at school. Universally it was Math at secondary school. We could all remember the words: sin, cosine and… Continue reading On “powerful”progressive teaching: creating the discourse of the subject

Progressivism · Teaching and Learning

Neither teacher nor student: learning happens in the spaces in between

I don’t think you can easily identify a good teacher. Some students respond to one person in a way they would not respond to another. Good teams have a variety of teachers, Students need to experience different personalities and teaching styles. The quirky and the boring can be equally effective in balanced teams. On the… Continue reading Neither teacher nor student: learning happens in the spaces in between

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On the problem of knowledge – part two: progressivism and the primacy of skills #blogsync

This is the second part of a contribution to the #blogsync Knowledge debate. In my last BLOG I offered a progressive view of knowledge and rejected Govian pedagogy and neo-traditionalism. Old Andrew sums up the neo-traditionalist view: To begin with, the question of how we select which knowledge is worth learning changes. While progressives have always… Continue reading On the problem of knowledge – part two: progressivism and the primacy of skills #blogsync