Education and Culture · Philosophy of education · Progressivism · Uncategorized

Blogging as story telling: unveiling the progressivism at the heart of the trivium and quadrivium

This is the third blog, in a series of three, about story- making. Let me make it clear when I use the word “story” I am not making a judgement on the truth, or otherwise, of the content rather I mean that the message is conveyed using story telling techniques. The first blog describes how… Continue reading Blogging as story telling: unveiling the progressivism at the heart of the trivium and quadrivium

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On the discursive gap: a story about why stories are so scary in education

The words below are the opening paragraphs of  a sacred scripture describing the second age of the elder race of man. The elder race of man, were an ancient civilisation who inhabited middle earth in a long forgotten age. These extracts are from a larger text found in an earthenware pot in the desert. It… Continue reading On the discursive gap: a story about why stories are so scary in education

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On Mitra’s “no holes in the wall” and the DT Willingham meme: weak research needs clever discourse to survive

I wanted to try and thread some recent twitter debates together and make the point that what often looks superficially to be random different issues are in fact related. I’m going touch upon the Sugata Mitra debate. Mitra is accused of poor research. I would describe it as “discursive research”. It generates discourse, the potential for… Continue reading On Mitra’s “no holes in the wall” and the DT Willingham meme: weak research needs clever discourse to survive

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Do multiple choice questions assess “higher order thinking”?

I’ve been pondering whether multiple choice questions assess “higher order thinking“. Daisy Christodoulou thinks they do: It is true that many selected-response questions do measure only shallow learning, but well-designed selected-response items can probe student understanding in some depth.’ Citing Dylan Wiliam: Wiliam gives some good examples of these types of question This example is… Continue reading Do multiple choice questions assess “higher order thinking”?

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Progressivism, classroom violence and traditional teaching in English schools in the 1970’s

I thought I would just respond to a recent twitter debate about “dominant ideology denialism”. The idea being that progressive ideologies have dominated education for the last thirty years. Some, including myself, are sceptical. It was suggested by Sue Cowley that perhaps age was a factor. I thought I would explore what has shaped my… Continue reading Progressivism, classroom violence and traditional teaching in English schools in the 1970’s

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On tacit knowledge Daisy Christodoulou could learn, a thing or two, from Jacques Derrida

I was a bit bemused reading Daisy Christodoulou’s piece on tacit knowledge. The point of the piece seemed to be that when attempting to achieve “quality writing” the use of criterion and rules become proxies for quality. I agree, I have (in the past, ahem, a long time ago) taught to tests, when required. Played the game.  In… Continue reading On tacit knowledge Daisy Christodoulou could learn, a thing or two, from Jacques Derrida

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The Sue Cowley question: education, social circumstance and knowledge

Sue Cowley recently posted, on twitter, the question: It reminded me of that famous Rousseau quote” (wo)man is born free, but (s)he is everywhere in chains,” .Or the Marx variant; “(wo)men make their own history, but they do not make it as they please”. Of course, apologies to Sue, I have put my own spin on it. I… Continue reading The Sue Cowley question: education, social circumstance and knowledge