Education and Politics · Philosophy of education · Progressivism

On the epistemic fallacy: a response to Tim and Martin:

I thought I would write a reply to two great blogs one by Martin Robinson and a second by Tim Taylor. Both great bloggers. I am conscious of reducing their respective opinions to one blog, which would be unfair so this is really just a contribution to the debate on the basis that their views are… Continue reading On the epistemic fallacy: a response to Tim and Martin:

Education and Culture · Education and Politics · OFSTED · Philosophy of education · Policy and Practice

Social objects, Space-time and Quirks in Educational policy making

In 1906, Albert Einstein announced his special theory of relativity. Soon after, Hermann Minkowski, his former college teacher in mathematics,  developed a new schema for thinking about space and time: Space-time does not evolve, it simply exists. When we examine a particular object from the stand point of its space-time representation, every particle is located… Continue reading Social objects, Space-time and Quirks in Educational policy making

Education and Politics · Philosophy of education · Progressivism · Research · Traditionalism

On non-cognitive skills and the “no position” position

I was interested over the Christmas period to follow, and engage with, the debate about the Progressive-Neo-Traditionalist dichotomy. I have also read some critiques of the dichotomy like this one by Stephen Tierney. It seemed to me that this particular blog conforms to the “no position” position. This usually entails a critique of the dichotomy before suggesting… Continue reading On non-cognitive skills and the “no position” position

Philosophy of education · Progressivism · Traditionalism

Traditionalist and progressive knowledge: causally related but analytically distinct

Introduction In this blog I would like to offer a view of the progressive v traditionalist dichotomy through the lens of structure, culture and agency. I am also going to argue that ideas can exist as material objects in the social world. There is a proviso; the ideas must have the potential to be understood.… Continue reading Traditionalist and progressive knowledge: causally related but analytically distinct

Philosophy of education · Progressivism · Traditionalism

Recent history shows the value of the Prog v Trad divide

There are, on the internet, numerous lists categorising progressivism and traditionalism. Mostly they are wrong for one simple reason, the dividing line between the two is not pedagogical but philosophical. You can use direct instruction in both approaches but in different ways and for different reasons. It is not only how it is taught but… Continue reading Recent history shows the value of the Prog v Trad divide

Education and Politics · OFSTED · Philosophy of education · Policy and Practice · Progressivism

On the value of ideas and the search for causality in the classroom

Can an idea be “real” like a light bulb or a torch? Does the text of a book contain something more than just symbols on a page? Do ideas have a causal effect measurable by empirical science? I was pondering these questions whilst watching the world pour opprobrium on Donald Trump’s comments about Muslims. Few… Continue reading On the value of ideas and the search for causality in the classroom

Education and Culture · Philosophy of education · Progressivism · Uncategorized

Blogging as story telling: unveiling the progressivism at the heart of the trivium and quadrivium

This is the third blog, in a series of three, about story- making. Let me make it clear when I use the word “story” I am not making a judgement on the truth, or otherwise, of the content rather I mean that the message is conveyed using story telling techniques. The first blog describes how… Continue reading Blogging as story telling: unveiling the progressivism at the heart of the trivium and quadrivium