Blog · Ofsted · Philosophy of Education · Uncategorized

On education and the influence of Cognitive Psychology: can you learn 1 + 1 = 3?

In this blog, I want to consider a Twitter debate on the nature of learning. I was surprised to learn that many educationalists believe you can learn untrue truth propositions. Education has long struggled to define learning but a relativist perspective has emerged due to the increasing influence of  Cognitive Psychology. Vygotsky, Bruner, James and Dewey have been… Continue reading On education and the influence of Cognitive Psychology: can you learn 1 + 1 = 3?

Ofsted · pedagogy · Philosophy of Education

On Ofsted’s definition of learning and designing an alternative

Introduction This blog, outlines the problematic nature of Ofsted’s definition of learning, offering an alternative 1. Ofsted defines learning as: (…) an alteration in long term memory. If nothing has altered in long-term memory, nothing has been learned 2. Learning causes alterations in memory but so does forgetting. You could easily replace learning with forgetting and Ofsted’s definition would work equally as well. Ofsted suffers… Continue reading On Ofsted’s definition of learning and designing an alternative

Blog · pedagogy · Philosophy of Education

On curriculum objects and designing learning experiences for the early years and beyond

In our previous blog, Ruth and I discussed the use of the discovery method.  I want to revisit that blog,  and the knowledge object 1 + 1 = 2, and cast a material lens1 on the nature of curriculum knowledge. As Ruth points out, this approach is particularly relevant to the early years because of… Continue reading On curriculum objects and designing learning experiences for the early years and beyond

pedagogy

On Professional Development: the smallness of repeated actions

Educational practice is, arguably, a specific form of human experience. Schutz describes “meaning” as a human reflection upon experience (or practice) making a distinction between experience and the meaning of that experience to the individual. In other words, what we do as teachers is not the same as the way we think about what we do. In… Continue reading On Professional Development: the smallness of repeated actions

Ofsted · pedagogy · Policy

On fabricated classroom practice: norm circles, placebos and evidence proxies

  I’ve been thinking about feedback; more specifically, how do you know whether feedback given to students is good or otherwise? Despite the research, I’m not convinced that feedback is a good thing per se. Good feedback is a good thing, bad feedback isn’t. You might think that is self-evident but research suggesting that feedback… Continue reading On fabricated classroom practice: norm circles, placebos and evidence proxies

pedagogy · Philosophy of Education · Powerful knowledge

The dangers for education of a simplistic ’cause and effect’ model of knowledge development

Biesta (2014) makes the point that over the last few years there has been an ongoing discussion about the place of knowledge in the curriculum: In a number of recent publications, the British sociologist Michael Young has argued that there is a need to bring knowledge back into the discussion about the curriculum (for example,… Continue reading The dangers for education of a simplistic ’cause and effect’ model of knowledge development

Uncategorized

On Freire, Hirsch and indoctrination: falling in love with statues is not always a good idea

In the first line of his epic poem, metamorphosis, the Roman poet Ovid sets the scene for the themes that he intends to cover, in nova fert animus mutatas dicere formas corpora, my mind leads me to tell of forms changed into new bodies, or similar, myth and change is Ovid’s concern. Later, much later,… Continue reading On Freire, Hirsch and indoctrination: falling in love with statues is not always a good idea

Uncategorized

Learning Styles: an epistemic not an empirical issue

There has been some talk about Learning Styles (LS) on BLOG’s recently. I use the concept, myself,  as an example of the pedagogic illiteracy of the ruling orthodoxy of education. Somewhat perversely I think it is a useful concept. The problem of LS begins with it’s empirical roots in the field of Psychology. Many have found… Continue reading Learning Styles: an epistemic not an empirical issue

Uncategorized

The Incoherence of the Incoherence: How the Profession Copes with Stupid

In The Incoherence of the Incoherence Ibn Rushd’s brilliant rebuttal of Imam Ghazalis pivotal Islamic text The Incoherence of the Philosophers , the central arguments lies with orthodoxy, faith and philosophy (or science as it would probably now be known). Employing Hellenistic logic, Ibn Rushd attempts to de-construct Ghazali’s critique of science, and defence of… Continue reading The Incoherence of the Incoherence: How the Profession Copes with Stupid